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Work on the CORKA trial - Community-based Rehabilitation after Knee Arthroplasty - has officially started, led Dr Karen Barker, of NDORMS.

Work on the CORKA trial - Community-based Rehabilitation after Knee Arthroplasty - has officially started, led Dr Karen Barker, of NDORMS.

The study will investigate the effect of a multicomponent community based rehabilitation programme on patients that are at risk of a poor outcome after knee replacement surgery (knee arthroplasty), and compare this approach with standard care rehabilitation programmes.

In 2013, there were over 90,000 knee replacement procedures in the UK, representing a 7.3% increase over 2011, and this will continue to rise due to an ageing population and obesity, amongst other factors.

Whilst being a routine procedure, around 15% of patients who undergo knee replacement surgery report to have continuing pain and mobility problems - a poor outcome - that limit or prevent them from being able to do activities they'd like to do.

Dr Barker said: "Given the increasing number of knee replacements, the relative limited physiotherapy resource available and the increasing age and frailty of patients receiving joint replacements, it is important that we concentrate our rehabilitation resources on those patients who most need help to avoid poor outcome." She added: "The CORKA study will provide us with essential information to help us maximise our resources and improve care to patients."

The CORKA study has been funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme (project number 12/196/08). You can read more about it on the NIHR website and the OCTRU website.