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BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to analyze the nature of shared content of total joint arthroplasty patients on Instagram. Specifically, we evaluated social media posts for: (1) perspective and timing; (2) tone; (3) focus (activities of daily living [ADLs], rehabilitation, return-to-work); and (4) the comparison between hip and knee arthroplasties. METHODS: A search of the public Instagram domain was performed over a 6-month period. Total hip and knee arthroplasties (THA and TKA) were selected for the analysis using the following terms: "#totalhipreplacement," "#totalkneereplacement," and associated terms. 1287 individual public posts of human subjects were shared during the period. A categorical scoring system was utilized for media format (photo or video), time (preoperative, perioperative, or postoperative) period, tone (positive or negative), return-to-work, ADLs, rehabilitation, surgical site, radiograph image, satisfaction, and dissatisfaction. RESULTS: Ninety-one percent of the posts were shared during the postoperative period. Ninety-three percent of posts had a positive tone. Thirty-four percent of posts focused on both ADLs and 33.8% on rehabilitation. TKA patients shared more about their surgical site (14.5% vs 3.3%, P < .001) and rehabilitation (58.9% vs 8.8%, P < .001) than THA patients, whereas THA patients shared more about ADLs than TKA patients (60.5% vs 7.6%, P < .001). CONCLUSION: When sharing their experience on Instagram, arthroplasty patients did so with a positive tone, starting a week after surgery. TKA posts focused more on rehabilitation and wound healing than THA patients, whereas THA patients shared more posts on ADLs. The analysis of social media posts provides insight into what matters to patients after total joint arthroplasty.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.arth.2017.03.067

Type

Journal article

Journal

J arthroplasty

Publication Date

09/2017

Volume

32

Pages

2694 - 2700

Keywords

Instagram, arthroplasty, hip, knee, social media, Activities of Daily Living, Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip, Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee, Humans, Postoperative Period, Return to Work, Social Media