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There has been extensive discussion about the effect of delay to surgery on mortality in patients sustaining a fracture of the hip. Despite the low level of evidence provided by many studies, a consensus has been accepted that delay of > 48 hours is detrimental to survival. The aim of this prospective observational study was to determine if early surgery confers a survival benefit at 30 days. Between 1989 and 2013, data were prospectively collected on patients sustaining a fracture of the hip at Peterborough City Hospital. They were divided into groups according to the time interval between admission and surgery. These thresholds ranged from < 6 hours to between 49 and 72 hours. The outcome which was assessed was the 30-day mortality. Adjustment for confounders was performed using multivariate binary logistic regression analysis. In all, 6638 patients aged > 60 years were included. Worsening American Society of Anaesthesiologists grade (p < 0.001), increased age (p < 0.001) and extracapsular fracture (p < 0.019) increased the risk of 30-day mortality. Increasing mobility score (p = 0.014), mini mental test score (p < 0.001) and female gender (p = 0.014) improved survival. After adjusting for these confounders, surgery before 12 hours improved survival compared with surgery after 12 hours (p = 0.013). Beyond this the increasing delay to surgery did not significantly affect the 30-day mortality.

Original publication

DOI

10.1302/0301-620X.97B1.33924

Type

Journal article

Journal

Bone and joint journal

Publication Date

01/01/2015

Volume

97-B

Pages

104 - 108