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Exercise interventions are often incompletely described in reports of clinical trials hampering evaluation of results and replication and implementation into practice.To develop a standardized method for reporting exercise programs in clinical trials, the Consensus on Exercise Reporting Template (CERT).Using the EQUATOR Network's methodological framework we invited 137 exercise experts to participate in a Delphi consensus study. A list of 41 items was identified from a meta-epidemiologic study of 73 systematic reviews of exercise. For each item, participants indicated agreement on an 11-point rating scale. Consensus for item inclusion was defined a priori as greater than 70% agreement of respondents rating an item seven or above. We used three sequential rounds of anonymous online questionnaires and a Delphi workshop.There were 57 (response rate 42%), 54 and 49 respondents to Rounds 1-3 respectively from 11 countries and a range of disciplines. In Round One, two items were excluded; 24 items reached consensus for inclusion (eight items in original format); and 16 items revised in response to participant suggestions. Of 14 items in Round Two, three were excluded; 11 reached consensus for inclusion (four items accepted in original format); and seven reworded. Sixteen items were included in Round Three and all items reached greater than 70% consensus for inclusion.The CERT, a 16-item checklist developed by an international panel of exercise experts, is designed to improve the reporting of exercise programs in all evaluative study designs and contains seven categories: materials, provider, delivery, location, dosage, tailoring, and compliance. The CERT will encourage transparency, improve trial interpretation and replication and facilitate implementation of effective exercise interventions into practice.

Type

Journal article

Journal

Physical therapy

Publication Date

05/05/2016

Addresses

S.C. Slade, PhD, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Cabrini Institute, 183 Wattletree Rd, Ste 41, Malvern, Victoria, Australia, and Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.