Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Many individuals experience long-term quality of life (QOL) impairment following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Factors contributing to poor QOL and psychological health >5 years after ACLR remain unclear. This study aimed to describe QOL and psychological health outcomes in people with knee difficulties (pain, symptoms, or functional limitations) 5-20 years following ACLR and identify factors explaining variability in these outcomes. Participants with knee difficulties 5-20 years following ACLR completed a battery of validated patient-reported outcomes [including the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), ACL-QOL, and the Assessment of QOL (AQoL-8D) instrument]. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify factors explaining variability in outcomes. One hundred sixty-two participants aged 38 ± 9 (mean ± SD) years completed questionnaires 9 ± 4 (range 5-20) years following ACLR. Thirty-nine percent of participants returned to competitive sport, 28% returned to a lower level, and 32% did not return to sport after ACLR. Not returning to sport after ACLR was associated with worse KOOS-QOL (β = 0.29, P = 0.001 [mean ± SD (55 ± 20)], ACL-QOL [β = 0.48, P < 0.001; (57 ± 21)], and AQoL-8D [β = 0.22, P = 0.02 (0.80 ± 0.14)]) scores. Increased body mass index (56% were overweight/obese) was related to worse QOL and more depressive symptoms. Subsequent knee surgery and contralateral ACLR were also associated with poorer QOL outcomes in these individuals.

Original publication

DOI

10.1111/sms.12698

Type

Journal article

Journal

Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports

Publication Date

05/2017

Volume

27

Pages

514 - 524

Addresses

Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences (NDORMS), University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.