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Osteoporotic fracture has a major impact upon health, both in terms of acute and long term disability and economic cost. Peak bone mass, achieved in early adulthood, is a major determinant of osteoporosis risk in later life. Poor early growth predicts reduced bone mass, and so risk of fracture in later life. Maternal lifestyle, body build and 25(OH) vitamin D status predict offspring bone mass. Recent work has suggested epigenetic mechanisms as key to these observations. This review will explore the role of the early environment in determining later osteoporotic fracture risk.

Original publication

DOI

10.3390/ijerph7041760

Type

Journal article

Journal

International journal of environmental research and public health

Publication Date

16/04/2010

Volume

7

Pages

1760 - 1772

Addresses

Medical Research Council Epidemiology Resource Centre, University of Southampton School of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK. lrg@mrc.soton.ac.uk

Keywords

Humans, Cohort Studies, Maternal Exposure, Bone Development, Pregnancy, Female