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A fundamental role of the mammalian immune system is to eradicate pathogens while minimizing immunopathology. Instigating and maintaining immunological tolerance within the intestine represents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system. Regulatory T cells are critical for continued immune tolerance in the intestine through active control of innate and adaptive immune responses. Dynamic adaptation of regulatory T-cell populations to the intestinal tissue microenvironment is key in this process. Here, we discuss specialization of regulatory T-cell responses in the intestine, and how a breakdown in these processes can lead to chronic intestinal inflammation.

Original publication

DOI

10.1101/cshperspect.a018341

Type

Journal article

Journal

Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in biology

Publication Date

07/2013

Volume

5

Addresses

Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RE, United Kingdom.

Keywords

Gastrointestinal Tract, Intestines, Antigen-Presenting Cells, Humans, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Interleukin-10, Immune Tolerance, Immunity, Cellular, Models, Immunological, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory, Microbiota