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Chronic cardiorespiratory disease is associated with low birthweight suggesting the importance of the developmental environment. Prenatal factors affecting fetal growth are believed important, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. The influence of developmental programming on bronchial hyperreactivity is investigated in an animal model and evidence for comparable associations is sought in humans. Pregnant Wistar rats were fed either control or protein-restricted diets throughout pregnancy. Bronchoconstrictor responses were recorded from offspring bronchial segments. Morphometric analysis of paraffin-embedded lung sections was conducted. In a human mother-child cohort ultrasound measurements of fetal growth were related to bronchial hyperreactivity, measured at age six years using methacholine. Protein-restricted rats' offspring demonstrated greater bronchoconstriction than controls. Airway structure was not altered. Children with lesser abdominal circumference growth during 11-19 weeks' gestation had greater bronchial hyperreactivity than those with more rapid abdominal growth. Imbalanced maternal nutrition during pregnancy results in offspring bronchial hyperreactivity. Prenatal environmental influences might play a comparable role in humans.

Type

Journal article

Journal

Scientific reports

Publication Date

01/2014

Volume

4

Addresses

1] Clinical and Experimental Sciences Academic Unit, University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine, Southampton, UK [2] NIHR Southampton Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit [3].

Keywords

Lung, Bronchi, Animals, Humans, Rats, Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects, Bronchoconstrictor Agents, Diet, Protein-Restricted, Models, Animal, Embryonic Development, Pregnancy, Pregnancy, Animal, Female, Embryo, Mammalian