Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.
BE PART OF RESEARCH logo

On International Clinical Trials Day this year, NIHR launched its ‘Be Part of Research’ campaign – aiming to provide a source of information for people to find out what research is currently taking place across the UK. The campaign raised awareness by featuring real life stories of patients who have been successfully involved in clinical research.

As part of the campaign, the Be Part of Research (formerly UKCTG) website was launched, and this continues to run as an excellent resource for anyone working or interested in clinical trials, providing details on what research is about and the many ways to get involved, as well as a listing of all studies currently taking place across the UK. The website has a search function to allow you to look through this listing for research on particular conditions or drugs, or find out where there may be studies running near you.

Again, this is a wonderful resource and OCTRU wholeheartedly recommend that you visit the website at https://bepartofresearch.nihr.ac.uk/ and take a look around!

 

 

Similar stories

Plaster cast or metal pins to treat a broken wrist? The results are in.

An Oxford study published in The BMJ has found the use of metal K-wires (commonly known as ‘pins’) to hold broken wrist bones in place while they heal are no better than a traditional moulded plaster cast.

SCIENCE spreads across the world

Oxford Trauma are pleased to open their first overseas site for the SCIENCE study.

Treatment choice for rotator cuff disorders could create efficiency and savings for the NHS

A trial that evaluated the clinical and cost effectiveness of physiotherapy treatments for rotator cuff disorders suggests cost savings can be made while maintaining positive patient outcomes.