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Professor of Matrix Biology Kim Midwood, of the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, NDORMS has been named in the BioBeat 2015 Movers and Shakers report.

The 2015 report recognises 50 inspirational women in biobusiness in the UK who are challenging the status quo to bring better health to people around the world. The annual BioBeat report highlights 50 inspirational female entrepreneurs, pioneers and advisors across the industry. 

Founded in 2012 by Miranda Weston-Smith, BioBeat aims to bring fresh energy and growth to the bio sector.  

Successful women entrepreneurs and leaders can support the rapid transformation of the global biobusiness sector, as research suggests they adopt different strategies for success which can lead to business models that more effectively engage talent in broader, more inclusive and more dynamic ways.

Professor Midwood's research focuses on how the cellular microenvironment defines the immune response. She uses a multidisciplinary approach incorporating structural, biochemical, molecular, proteomic and epigenetic tools to find new diagnostics and therapeutics to control inflammation. 

She founded the BioTech company Nascient Ltd in 2012 to develop new drugs for inhibiting chronic inflammation in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. She also has a long history of consulting for biotech companies. 

"I am delighted to be listed in the BioBeat report; it's a real honour to be recognised alongside all the women nominated who have had a tremendous impact in the Bio Tech world, and I hope that this report encourages more women to consider taking on a role in the BioBusiness sector", says Professor Midwood.

Visit 50 Movers and Shakers in BioBusiness 2015 for the full list.

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