Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

NDORMS announces the closure of the Kennedy and Botnar Institutes and outlines other plans and activities for the department during the pandemic.

Coronavirus close up © Shutterstock

Regretfully, we are announcing the closure of the Kennedy and Botnar Institutes effective from noon on Wednesday 25 March. The Kadoorie Centre based at the John Radcliffe Hospital will remain open for staff working in clinical roles in the NHS and for essential follow-up of patients already recruited into clinical studies.

Many of our staff and postgraduate students will be continuing their day-to-day work from home, while others may take on or extend a clinical role to support the NHS in the fight against COVID-19. Some of our research teams are working towards solutions to contain the spread of coronavirus and we will share updates on this as we have them.

All new clinical research will be put on hold and recruitment of new participants to our clinical studies in Oxford will be paused.

For students, teaching and learning in Trinity term will be moved to an online format where possible, and there will be no conventional written paper exams. Detailed planning continues but our aim throughout is to ensure students can continue, or complete, their academic careers at Oxford. Most of our scheduled workshops/modules for postgraduate research students have been postponed and students are being advised to keep in touch with their supervisors.

Professor Andrew Carr, Head of Department said: "Researchers at NDORMS and across Oxford are at the forefront of global efforts to understand this coronavirus (COVID-19) and protect our communities.

I would like to thank all our teams at NDORMS who are supporting these efforts and the very responsible and collegiate way in which you have responded to this unprecedented situation. It is very stressful and disruptive for everyone particularly those with extra risk factors. In addition, many members of the department have family members and loved ones who are at high risk and many live in other countries where restrictions to travel make visits impossible."

The University of Oxford COVID-19 research hub features regular updates about the latest research publications and longer-form pieces covering the many ways Oxford is approaching this pandemic: www.ox.ac.uk/coronavirus-research.

Funding for Oxford's COVID-19 research requires unprecedented speed, scope and ambition and anyone wishing to fund the university's efforts can donate here: http://www.ox.ac.uk/coronavirus-research/support

For more information please contact communications@ndorms.ox.ac.uk in the first instance, and we can direct your enquiry to the appropriate team.

Similar stories

New children’s orthopaedic hospital opens in Zimbabwe

Main

A new children’s orthopaedic hospital in Bulawayo that will treat children across Zimbabwe who are living with musculoskeletal impairments has opened today.

Professor Katja Simon elected to the Academy of Medical Sciences

Awards Kennedy Main

Professor of Immunology Katja Simon has been elected as a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

3,400 different medicines used globally to treat COVID-19

Main Statistics and epidemiology

Insufficient data, and misleading recommendations led to significant early heterogeneity in global COVID-19 patient management, according to recent BMJ study

Clinical trial finds Azithromycin has no benefit against COVID-19

Main OCTRU

A clinical trial by University of Oxford researchers has confirmed that the antibiotic azithromycin has no clinical benefit in people with moderate COVID-19.

Study reveals the three most important aspects of care for hip fractures

Hip Main OCTRU Research Trauma

Older patients with hip fractures recover better if they receive treatment under the supervision of both a surgeon and a specialist in elderly care; are checked to avoid future falls; and are assessed for memory problems.

Major ERC funding awarded to Professor Michael Dustin

Awards Kennedy Main

Professor Michael Dustin and an international team of collaborators have been awarded a €10M grant from the European Research Council (ERC) to develop a new biotechnology around supramolecular attack particles (SMAPs) engineered to kill cancer cells.