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FUTURE-GB has bounced into 2022 ahead of both predicted recruitment into Stage 2 (the Randomised Controlled Trial), and the sites open in Stage 2! Congratulations to all our sites for their hard work so far.

Glioblastoma (GB) is the most common primary brain tumour and is incurable. As a patient’s tumour grows patients experience a reduction in their quality of life.  The main treatments for GB are surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, given in combination. For patients where it is thought that surgery will benefit, a surgeon often removes as much tumour as possible, whilst limiting the risk of causing damage, such as weakness, speech, or cognitive difficulties. However, which technology a surgeon should use during surgery to remove the tumour safely is unclear. 

FUTURE-GB is looking at the difference in patient-reported quality of life following brain tumour surgery with either Standard of Care technology or using additional imaging before, and during, the surgery. It aims to see if GB surgery with these extra technologies added to the standard ones, increases a patient’s good functioning quality of life, so-called Deterioration Free Survival (DFS).

The trial is in 2 Stages: Stage 1, an IDEAL 2b learning and harmonisation phase where sites are given continuous feedback to optimise their use of the additional technology at site; and Stage 2, the full Randomised Controlled Trial. Each site progresses from Stage 1 to 2 on an individual basis and as such we are always looking for new participating sites, please get in touch if you would like to know more!

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