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TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOUR ROLE

I coordinate concurrent research studies – commercial and non-commercial – in rheumatology, orthopaedics and bone infection liaising with multidisciplinary clinical teams and sponsors, ensuring the smooth running of the trials.

I offer patients support before, during and after the study, acting as their advocate and making sure they receive the best possible treatment for their condition/situation.

I studied nursing, qualifying in 1992. After completing a degree in English, I moved to the UK and accepted a job at the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre. I initially gained experience in Rheumatology and orthopaedics. After 4 years as a staff nurse on the wards, I applied for a research nurse post. I had always been interested in research and took part in various trials as a student nurse. 18 + years on, I am still passionate about my job.

WHAT IS THE MOST MEANINGFUL ASPECT OF YOUR WORK?

I would say, making a difference in patients’ lives. Giving them the opportunity to trial a new medicine for instance and see the improvement it makes in their day to day life.

CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT SOMETHING YOU'VE DONE, CONTRIBUTED TO THAT YOU'RE MOST PROUD OF?

This year has been very disruptive for our research. In March, my colleagues and myself were told to leave our trials to one side and help with public health studies. I was redeployed to the John Radcliffe and helped out with COVID-19 studies – the most famous one being RECOVERY. It was very daunting at first and out of my comfort zone but I soon found my feet with the Taskforce and was amazed at the difference we all made to find treatment for COVID-19.

WHAT CHANGES WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO SEE IN THE MEDICAL SCIENCES IN THE NEXT 100 YEARS?

I have seen so many changes over the past couple of decades. The discovery and implementation of anti-TNFα being the most game changing. I can’t quite imagine what the next 100 years will be like. I would like to see the development of personalised medicine. Imagine being able to get a faster diagnosis depending on our unique genetic make-up, be given personalised treatments based on what would be most effective for us and hopefully experience fewer side effects. 

 

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