Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Professor Jonathan Rees and colleagues in the Surgical Intervention Trials Unit (SITU) have just been awarded a £1.5 million National Institute of Health Research HTA grant for the PRoCuRe trial to explore the benefits of surgical repair of partial rotator cuff tendon tears of the shoulder.

Professor Jonathan Rees

Rotator cuff problems are the most common cause of shoulder pain and disability, affecting people with day to day activities, work, recreation and sleep. These tears can be full tears through the whole tendon or only partially through. Partial tears are usually treated in the NHS first with physiotherapy and a steroid injection but then surgery if the patient does not get better.

Professor Rees, Section Head Orthopaedic and Plastic Surgery at the Botnar Research Centre, NDORMS says: "Surgery for full tears is one of the most common shoulder operations in the UK but for partial tears we still don't know if surgical repair gives patients a better result in the short term, or whether it prevents full tears developing in the long term. UK patients and surgeons have prioirtised a need to answer this question which is why this trial has been funded by the HTA."

The PRoCuRe trial will take place across 20 NHS hospitals in the UK, recruiting adult patients , who have partial tears of the rotator cuff tendon and persistent shoulder pain after physiotherapy and injection treatments. The randomised controlled trial will compare arthroscopic (keyhole) surgery that cleans, tidies and repairs the tear, to a procedure that just cleans and tidies the tear. The team will monitor how well patients recover firstly over 2 years and then over 5 years.

Similar stories

NDORMS joins research partnership to understand links between overlapping long-term conditions

The links between different long-term health conditions will be explored in new research funded with a £2.5million grant from the Medical Research Council.

NDORMS researchers awarded grant for study on the effects of COVID-19 vaccines on long COVID

A team of NDORMS researchers including Doctor Annika Jödicke and Doctor Victoria Strauss have been awarded NIHR funding to carry out a study into the effects of different COVID-19 vaccines on long COVID.

New therapeutic targets identified in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis

Researchers identify two inflammatory-driving proteins, osteopontin and CCL2, highly expressed in psoriatic arthritis joints.

Researchers show the role of cilia in cartilage health

New research shows that disrupting primary cilia in juvenile, adolescent and early adulthood in cartilage stops it maturing correctly, making it more prone to thinning and the potential for osteoarthritis (OA) in later life.

SCIENCE spreads across the world

Oxford Trauma are pleased to open their first overseas site for the SCIENCE study.

Treatment choice for rotator cuff disorders could create efficiency and savings for the NHS

A trial that evaluated the clinical and cost effectiveness of physiotherapy treatments for rotator cuff disorders suggests cost savings can be made while maintaining positive patient outcomes.