Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A recent publication from the Powrie group at the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology has described a novel mechanism by which the commensal pathogen Heliobacter hepaticus maintains its niche in the intestinal environment.

None

The work, led by Dr Camille Danne in Prof Fiona Powrie’s group, describes the effects of a newly described H. hepaticus secreted polysaccharide on intestinal macrophages, promoting a pro-repair and anti-inflammatory gene signature and effector phenotype.  

The discovery of this mechanism provides a better understanding of the potential means of molecular crosstalk between key host cells in the gut and commensal bacteria.  By further understanding the pathways that promote tolerance and normal homeostasis, these same pathways can potentially be enhanced in order to restore balance after disruptive challenges and interventions such as antibiotic treatment, stress and food allergy, as well as to re-establish a balanced host–microbe dialogue in chronic inflammation.

The study, carried out in collaboration with Prof Simon Arthur’s group in the University of Dundee, was published in Cell Host and Microbe earlier this month and can be accessed here, as was a commentary on the paper from the Kullberg lab which can be found here

Similar stories

Oxford researchers call for an urgent re-evaluation of “weak” opioid safety profile

A new study associates dispensation doses of tramadol with increased risk of mortality, cardiovascular events, and fractures compared to the use of codeine to treat pain.

New therapeutic targets identified to treat inflammatory bowel disease

Millions of patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are given fresh hope as a new study shows why some of them do not respond to current treatments.

Afsie Sabokbar wins Lifetime Achievement at Teaching Excellence Awards

Director of Graduate Studies Afsie Sabokbar wins Lifetime Achievement at 2021 Teaching Excellence Awards.

NDORMS staff recognised in the 2021 Teaching Excellence Awards

Director of Graduate Studies Afsie Sabokbar, Associate Professor Stephanie Dakin and Graduate Studies Officer Samuel Burnell were all winners in the Teaching Excellence Awards.

Five ways to take action for your bone health

On World Osteoporosis Day, the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), the world’s largest non-governmental organisation in the bone field, urges action for osteoporosis and fracture prevention.

NDORMS researchers awarded funding by The Paget’s Association

Professor Philippa Hulley and Doctor Helen Knowles have been awarded funding by The Paget’s Association for their research on bone cells.