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Our Department has received an Athena SWAN Silver Award in recognition of our commitment to advancing equality and excellence in employment and education practices.

Athena SWAN Silver Award logo

The Athena SWAN Charter was established in 2005 to encourage and recognise commitment to advancing the careers of women in science, technology, engineering, maths and medicine (STEMM) employment in higher education and research.

In May 2015, the charter was expanded to recognise work undertaken to address gender equality more broadly, and not just barriers to progression that affect women.

Head of Department Professor Andrew Carr thanked all staff and students for their contribution in making NDORMS an inclusive and positive working environment for all and added: "This award celebrates our development of good employment practices, which encourage career development and an excellent work-life balance. We pride ourselves in having a thriving research programme, made possible because of our commitment to supporting and nurturing our staff and students."

Read our Athena Swan Silver Application.

See Athena SWAN at NDORMS here.

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