Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A clinical trial to test a new treatment for Dupuytren’s disease has commenced at the Kennedy Institute and Botnar Research Centre. Affecting 4% of the UK population, this disease causes fingers to curl into the palm and can be extremely disabling.

A clinical trial to test a new treatment for Dupuytren's disease has commenced at the Kennedy Institute and Botnar Research Centre. Affecting 4% of the UK population, this disease causes fingers to curl into the palm and can be extremely disabling.

The team led by Professor Nanchahal has already unraveled the molecular mechanisms that initiate and maintain the disease process. The clinical trial will look at the next step - to test a new treatment with anti-TNF, a drug currently approved for use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. If effective, this will represent the first targeted therapy involving a simple injection for patients with early Dupuytren's disease that will preserve hand function and avoid the need for subsequent more invasive treatments such as surgery.

Professor Nanchahal says "this is another exciting example of bench to bedside translation of findings based on tissues from patients".

Currently, there is no approved treatment for early disease. Once patients have established deformities, the diseased tissue is removed surgically or cut using less invasive techniques such as a needle or an enzyme. However, recovery following surgery usually takes several months and recurrence rates with the non-surgical techniques are high.

This research is funded by the Health Innovation Challenge Fund (Wellcome Trust + Department of Health).

Similar stories

Cognitive–behavioural therapy consistently improves quality of life

Main Rehabilitation and self-management Research

A meta-review of the available research into cognitive behavioural therapy reveals it consistently improves health-related quality of life across different medical conditions and demographic populations.

Oxford to collaborate with Janssen to map the cellular landscape of immune mediated disorders

Main Research

The University of Oxford has entered into a strategic collaboration with Janssen Biotech, Inc., one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson.

WHiTE Four trial results published

Hip Main OCTRU Orthopaedics and trauma Research

The results of the WHiTE Four clinical trial for the treatment of fragility hip fractures have been published in The Bone and Joint Journal.

Understanding the first wave of COVID-19 and implications for tackling the ongoing pandemic: evidence from 5.5 million people from Catalonia, Spain

Botnar Main Research Statistics and epidemiology

Health outcomes during the first wave of COVID-19 in Catalonia, Spain, have been described in detail in a study published by Nature Communications.

Immunology preprint reviews launched in Nature Reviews Immunology

Kennedy Main Research

The Oxford-Mount Sinai (OxMS) Preprint Journal Club has partnered with Nature Reviews Immunology to launch a monthly Preprint Watch column.

Living reviews launched by Oxford and Cardiff in the wake of COVID-19 research

Kennedy Main Research

In a combined effort to help COVID-19 researchers the University of Oxford and Cardiff University have launched a series of “living reviews” in Oxford University Press’s new open access journal “Oxford Open Immunology”.