Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A clinical trial to test a new treatment for Dupuytren’s disease has commenced at the Kennedy Institute and Botnar Research Centre. Affecting 4% of the UK population, this disease causes fingers to curl into the palm and can be extremely disabling.

A clinical trial to test a new treatment for Dupuytren's disease has commenced at the Kennedy Institute and Botnar Research Centre. Affecting 4% of the UK population, this disease causes fingers to curl into the palm and can be extremely disabling.

The team led by Professor Nanchahal has already unraveled the molecular mechanisms that initiate and maintain the disease process. The clinical trial will look at the next step - to test a new treatment with anti-TNF, a drug currently approved for use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. If effective, this will represent the first targeted therapy involving a simple injection for patients with early Dupuytren's disease that will preserve hand function and avoid the need for subsequent more invasive treatments such as surgery.

Professor Nanchahal says "this is another exciting example of bench to bedside translation of findings based on tissues from patients".

Currently, there is no approved treatment for early disease. Once patients have established deformities, the diseased tissue is removed surgically or cut using less invasive techniques such as a needle or an enzyme. However, recovery following surgery usually takes several months and recurrence rates with the non-surgical techniques are high.

This research is funded by the Health Innovation Challenge Fund (Wellcome Trust + Department of Health).

Similar stories

Celebrating Clinical Trials Day at NDORMS

To mark Clinical Trials Day we take a look at some of the recent developments at NDORMS and celebrate the teams that make this important area of our research programme possible.

REF 2021 results for medical research in Oxford

Today the UK Funding Bodies have published the outcomes of the recent national research assessment exercise, the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021.

Liposomal bupivacaine found to be no more effective than current treatments for post-operative knee pain

A new study published in JAMA, has found that a drug recently licensed in the UK has no effect on post-operative knee replacement recovery or pain, compared to the current treatment when administered at site of surgery.

New research suggests targeting blood vessels could be key to controlling fibrotic disease

By studying blood vessels at single cell resolution, Professor Jagdeep Nanchahal and colleagues found that in Dupuytren’s disease, a fibrotic disorder of the hand, the vasculature is key to orchestrating the development of human fibrosis.

AI helps to detect bone fractures to 92% accuracy

Research from the Botnar Institute for Musculoskeletal Sciences shows that Artificial intelligence (AI) is an effective tool for fracture detection that has potential to aid clinicians in busy emergency departments.

Defining the role of resident memory B cells in the fight against influenza

Researchers at the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology have used 3D and live-imaging to show how resident memory B cells boost antibodies to fight influenza.