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The Kennedy Trust for Rheumatology Research (KTRR) has pledged a minimum of £20M over five years to the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology at the University of Oxford to support pioneering research into chronic inflammatory disease.

The Kennedy Trust logo
Support from the Kennedy Trust has allowed us to attract exciting new investigators, establish new technologies, and develop an outstanding graduate training programme.
- Professor Fiona Powrie

The support from the KTRR will further the Kennedy Institute’s ambition to harness discovery research and identification of disease pathways for application in the clinic, driving innovative new therapies to benefit patients.

Director of the Institute Professor Fiona Powrie says: “I am delighted that the Kennedy Trust have agreed to extend funding for the Institute for a further five years. With their support we have been able to attract exciting new investigators, establish new technologies, and develop an outstanding graduate training programme.

The renewed, significant funding will allow us to deliver the next phase of our strategy, including capacity building in imaging, microbiome science, informatics, and clinical research to bridge the gap between basic and translational research.”

The new agreement extends the KTRR’s support to the Institute beyond the current agreement which expires in 2021. The funding is awarded through individual grants and subjected to independent review on a regular basis.

Pierre Espinasse, KTRR’s General Manager , says: The quality of the work undertaken at the Institute since its move to Oxford is hugely impressive and the Trust is delighted to be able to reaffirm its longterm commitment to supporting the Institute through this new agreement.

The KTRR funded the Kennedy Institute’s move to Oxford from London in 2013, contributing £22M to the new building located on the University of Oxford’s Old Road Campus, as well as a £5M equipment grant.

The initial agreement also committed £3M support per annum from 2011-2021 enabling the recruitment of new faculty to the Institute, as well as the development of state-of-the-art technology platforms to support key areas of research.

More broadly, the KTRR provides financial support for scientific research into improving ill health caused by rheumatic and related musculoskeletal and inflammatory diseases, particularly in areas that could benefit from long-term coordinated support.

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