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A careers event held by NDORMS offered information and advice to postdoctoral researchers transitioning to becoming independent group leaders.

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The event included a panel discussion with (from left to right): Prof Fiona Powrie (Director, Kennedy Institute), Dr Sophie Acton (UCL), Dr Chris Toseland (U Sheffield), Prof Mark Coles (Kennedy Institute) and Abigail Reynolds (BBSRC)

NDORMS was delighted to host a Career Education and Networking Event last month aimed at postdoctoral researchers and their transition to becoming independent Principal Investigators (PIs).

The afternoon and evening event included information on suitable funding schemes and application advice by Wellcome, BBSRC and MRC representatives in an open and informal session. This was followed by the highly regarded analysis of postdoc career progression by ‘A survey of new PIs in the UK’ authors Sophie Acton and Chris Toseland, which offered practical, real-world information for new and prospective PIs on relevant topics such as gender issues, research group dynamics, negotiation, salary, start-up costs.

The event was organised by NDORMS Postdoc Advisor Prof James Edwards, together with Drs Emily Thornton and Natasha Whibley representing the Kennedy Postdoc Committee.

Speaking of the event James said, "It was wonderful to see so much active engagement between our NDORMS post doc group and invited speakers, and is clear that such sessions make a strong and worthwhile contribution to the successful career development of NDORMS post docs and to their plans for the future".

“We were thrilled to secure an exciting range of panellists and were grateful for their varied perspectives. The suggestions from Sophie and Chris to those applying for PI positions follows a survey of almost 400 PIs across the UK, and their advice was timely and relevant for many of the postdocs here in NDORMS who are looking towards independent careers”, said Emily.

The NDORMS Postdoc Advisor team would welcome all feedback and suggestions for future events and new ways in which NDORMS postdocs might be supported.

 
   
   

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