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Congratulations to Hanlin Zhang for being awarded the first Oxford-Elysium Fellowship in cellular health.

This three year fellowship is aimed at supporting the brightest and most promising scientists in their early research careers at the University of Oxford.

The award will support his study into autophagy; the intracellular degradation system which recycles damaged cellular components. Decreased autophagy levels have been associated with age-related diseases such as neurodegeneration and cancer. Hanlin aims to elucidate a novel autophagy signaling pathway and identify novel drug targets within this pathway to increase autophagy levels to achieve healthier ageing.

Commenting on his award, Hanlin said "Human ageing is a very complex process and associated with many severe diseases. Autophagy plays a critical role in regulating cell homeostasis and senescence. I am happy and grateful to be awarded this early-career fellowship. It will help me gain a deeper insight into this novel autophagy and ageing pathway, which might help unveil the ageing mystery.”

Hanlin will be based primarily within the Kennedy Institue under the supervision of Prof. Katja Simon.

 

Funding Body

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