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Structural changes of bone and cartilage are a hallmark of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Despite certain similarities - in particular, inflammation as the driving force for structural changes - the three major inflammatory joint diseases show considerably different pathologies. Whereas RA primarily results in bone and cartilage resorption, PsA combines destructive elements with anabolic bone responses, and AS is the prototype of a hyper-responsive joint disease associated with substantial bone and cartilage apposition. In the present review we summarize the clinical picture and pathophysiologic processes of bone and cartilage damage in RA, PsA, and AS, we describe the key insights obtained from the introduction of TNF blockade, and we discuss the future challenges and frontiers of structural damage in arthritis.

Original publication

DOI

10.1186/1478-6354-13-S1-S4

Type

Journal article

Journal

Arthritis res ther

Publication Date

25/05/2011

Volume

13 Suppl 1

Keywords

Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antirheumatic Agents, Arthritis, Psoriatic, Arthritis, Rheumatoid, Clinical Trials as Topic, Humans, Spondylitis, Ankylosing, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha