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Studies using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) have shown that the femoral components of cemented total hip replacements (THR) migrate distally relative to the bone, but it is not clear whether this occurs at the cement-implant or the cement-bone interface or within the cement mantle. Our aim was to determine where this migration occurred, since this has important implications for the way in which implants function and fail. Using RSA we compared for two years the migration of the tip of the stem with that of the cement restrictor for two different designs of THR, the Exeter and Charnley Elite. We have assumed that if the cement restrictor migrates, then at least part of the cement mantle also migrates. Our results have shown that the Exeter migrates distally three times faster than the Charnley Elite and at different interfaces. With the Exeter migration was at the cement-implant interface whereas with the Charnley Elite there was migration at both the cement-bone and the cement-implant interfaces.

Original publication

DOI

10.1302/0301-620x.81b1.8904

Type

Journal article

Journal

The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volume

Publication Date

01/1999

Volume

81

Pages

130 - 134

Addresses

Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford, England, UK.

Keywords

Humans, Prosthesis Failure, Bone Cements, Photogrammetry, Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip, Prosthesis Design, Aged, Middle Aged, Female, Male