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AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the Orthopaedic Trauma Society (OTS) classification of open fractures and economic costs. METHODS: Resource use was measured during the six months that followed open fractures of the lower limb in 748 adults recruited as part of two large clinical trials within the UK Major Trauma Research Network. Resource inputs were valued using unit costs drawn from primary and secondary sources. Economic costs (GBP sterling, 2017 to 2018 prices), estimated from both a NHS and Personal Social Services (PSS) perspective, were related to the degree of complexity of the open fracture based on the OTS classification. RESULTS: Adjusted mean total NHS and PSS costs were £13,785 following treatment of complex fractures and £3,550 following treatment of simple fractures, where the open fracture wound is closed at the end of the first wound debridement, generating a mean difference of £10,235 (95% confidence interval £8,074 to £12,396). CONCLUSION: Following previous work correlating clinical outcomes with the OTS classification of open fractures, this study suggests that the new OTS classification also correlates with economic costs estimated from alternative study perspectives. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2022;104-B(3):408-412.

Original publication

DOI

10.1302/0301-620X.104B3.BJJ-2021-1237.R1

Type

Journal article

Journal

Bone joint j

Publication Date

03/2022

Volume

104-B

Pages

408 - 412

Keywords

Classification, Cost, Open fracture, Orthopaedic Trauma, clinical outcomes, clinical trials, complex fractures, open fractures, open fractures of the lower limb, reconstructive procedure, simple fractures, wound, wound debridement