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INTRODUCTION: The authors examined how body mass index (BMI) across life is linked to the risk of midlife knee osteoarthritis (OA), testing whether prolonged exposure to high BMI or high BMI at a particular period has the greatest influence on the risk of knee OA. METHODS: A population-based British birth cohort of 3035 men and women underwent clinical examination for knee OA at age 53 years.Heights and weights were measured 10 times from 2 to 53 years. Analyses were stratified by gender and adjusted for occupation and activity levels. RESULTS: The prevalence of knee OA was higher in women than in men (12.9% (n=194) vs 7.4% (n=108)). In men, the association between BMI and later knee OA was evident at 20 years (p=0.038) and remained until 53 years (OR per z-score 1.38 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.71)). In women, there was evidence for an association at 15 years (p=0.003); at 53 years, the OR was 1.89 (95% CI 1.59 to 2.24) per z-score increase in BMI. Changes in BMI from childhood in women and from adolescence in men were also positively associated with knee OA. A structured modelling approach to disentange the way in which BMI is linked to knee OA suggested that prolonged exposure to high BMI throughout adulthood carried the highest risk and that there was no additional risk conferred from adolescence once adult BMI had been accounted for. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the risk of knee OA accumulates from exposure to a high BMI through adulthood.

Type

Journal article

Journal

Annals of the rheumatic diseases

Publication Date

05/2012

Volume

71

Pages

655 - 660

Addresses

MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing, University College London, 33 Bedford Place, London WC1B 5JU, UK. a.wills@nshd.mrc.ac.uk

Keywords

Humans, Osteoarthritis, Knee, Obesity, Body Mass Index, Cohort Studies, Life Change Events, Comorbidity, Sex Factors, Middle Aged, Great Britain, Female, Male