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It is well established that an intimate connection exists between inflammation and neoplasia. Indeed, particular chronic infections and autoimmune processes giving rise to prolonged site-specific inflammation are known to increase the probability of the development of specific cancers. Molecular characterisation of these processes has revealed profound similarities in the specific molecules involved in persistence of inflammation and in both the primary induction of neoplastic processes and in specification of the preferred anatomic sites of metastatic spread. The therapeutic importance of these findings is underscored by the remarkable success in the treatment of autoimmune pathology using medications initially developed for use in oncology and this arena is one of considerable therapeutic promise for rheumatologists.

Original publication

DOI

10.1186/ar4203

Type

Journal article

Journal

Arthritis research & therapy

Publication Date

01/2013

Volume

15

Keywords

Humans, Neoplasms, Autoimmune Diseases, Inflammation, Rheumatology, Translational Medical Research