Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

T-cell activation requires interaction of T-cell antigen receptors with proteins of the major histocompatibility complex (antigen). This interaction takes place in a specialized cell-cell junction referred to as an immunological synapse. The immunological synapse contains at least two functional domains: a central cluster of engaged antigen receptors and a surrounding ring of adhesion molecules. The segregation of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) and adhesion molecules is based on size, with the TCR interaction spanning 15 nm and the lymphocyte-function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) interaction spanning 30-40 nm between the two cells. Therefore, the synapse is not an empty gap, but a space populated by both adhesion and signaling molecules. This chapter considers four aspects of the immunological synapse: the role of migration and stop signals, the role of the cytoskeleton, the role of self-antigenic complexes, and the role of second signals.

Original publication

DOI

10.1186/ar559

Type

Journal article

Journal

Arthritis research

Publication Date

01/2002

Volume

4 Suppl 3

Pages

S119 - S125

Addresses

Department of Pathology, New York University School of Medicine, Skirball Institute for Biomolecular Medicine, New York 10016, USA. dustin@saturn.med.nyu.edu

Keywords

Antigen-Presenting Cells, T-Lymphocytes, Intercellular Junctions, Animals, Humans, Signal Transduction