Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Although many children with spina bifida and associated scoliosis or dislocated hips undergo spine or hip surgery, the benefits are uncertain.The purpose was to perform an evidence-based review on the benefits and risks of surgery for dislocated hips and scoliosis in spina bifida.I performed a Medline(®) and Embase(®) search from 1950 to 2009 for Level I to Level III studies investigating the benefits and risks of surgery for scoliosis and hip dislocation in patients with spina bifida. When available, I extracted types of surgery, complication rates, functional outcomes of seating, walking, and overall physical function. All treatment recommendations received a Grade of Recommendation: Grade A (consistent Level I studies); Grade B (consistent Level II and III studies); Grade C (consistent level IV and V studies); or Grade I (insufficient or contradictory studies).Combined anterior and posterior surgery had lower rates of nonunion for scoliosis. Although there may be some benefit in seating, overall physical function measured in a different and nonstandardized fashion was not much changed and major complication rates, including nonunion and infections for scoliosis surgery, exceed 50% in several studies. For dislocated hips, the impact on walking ability appears related to contracture (not dislocation). Surgery for hip dislocation did not improve walking ability. The literature provides no guidance on the best treatment for unilateral dislocation.The benefits of scoliosis surgery are uncertain (Grade I). Spine surgery, if performed, should be anterior and posterior (Grade B). An all-pedicle approach for scoliosis surgery may be effective (Level I). Hip reduction surgery did not improve walking (Grade B) but may be appropriate in low-level unilateral dislocation (Level I).

Original publication

DOI

10.1007/s11999-010-1595-y

Type

Journal article

Journal

Clinical orthopaedics and related research

Publication Date

05/2011

Volume

469

Pages

1258 - 1264

Addresses

Department of Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, 1254-555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada. james.wright@sickkids.ca

Keywords

Spine, Hip Joint, Humans, Scoliosis, Spinal Dysraphism, Treatment Outcome, Walking, Orthopedic Procedures, Risk Assessment, Evidence-Based Medicine, Recovery of Function, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Joint Dislocations