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We have previously reported the short-term migration of cemented Hinek femoral components using radiostereometric analysis (RSA). We now report the mid-term migration. During the first 2 years after implantation the prosthesis subsided into varus and rotated internally. Between years 3 and 8 the prosthesis continued to rotate internally with the head moving posteriorly (0.07 mm/year, P=0.004). It also continued to fall into varus with the tip moving laterally (0.07 mm/year, P=0.04). The head (0.06 mm/year, P<0.0001), shoulder (0.04 mm/year, P=0.0001) and tip (0.04 mm/year, P=0.001) continued to migrate distally. There were two cases of failure due to aseptic loosening during the follow-up period. During the second year both of these had posterior head migration, which was abnormally rapid (>2 SD from the mean). We have demonstrated that a cemented implant has slow but significant levels of migration and rotation for at least 8 years after implantation. Our study confirms that implants with abnormally rapid posterior head migration during the second year are likely to fail.

Original publication

DOI

10.1007/s002640050331

Type

Journal article

Journal

International orthopaedics

Publication Date

01/1999

Volume

23

Pages

140 - 144

Addresses

Oxford Orthopaedic Engineering Centre, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Keywords

Hip Joint, Humans, Foreign-Body Migration, Prosthesis Failure, Bone Cements, Photogrammetry, Prognosis, Follow-Up Studies, Prosthesis Design, Hip Prosthesis, Movement, Female, Male, Evaluation Studies as Topic