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Centre for Statistics in Medicine


Statistics expertise for medical and healthcare research

We collaborate with researchers across the UK and the globe to conduct world-class medical and healthcare research, aiming to advance healthcare practice and policy. We are committed to improving the standard of medical research methodology through research on research and methods development. We champion transparent and complete reporting of health research through reporting guidelines and training provision.

20 years experience in medical statistics

80+ current trials

Team of medical statisticians, epidemiologists, methodologists and systematic review specialists

Home of the Oxford Clinical Trials Research Unit (OCTRU) and the UK EQUATOR Centre

Latest news

Six-month outcomes after treatment for COVID-19 on intensive care units in England

Researchers at the University of Oxford are investigating the long-term health outcomes for patients who have been treated for severe COVID-19 disease in intensive care.

Patients with rheumatic pain increasingly turning to opioids

Reporting at EULAR, researchers found that opioid use by patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal pain was on the rise in Europe.

Could do better: clinical trial reporting fails to live up to the mark

The statistical analysis and reporting of treatment effects in reports of randomised trials with a binary primary endpoint requires substantial improvement, suggests NDORMS research published in BMC Medicine.

COVID-19 prognosis and prediction models for medical decision-making are flawed, say researchers

The modelling and approach to tackle the hard medical decisions associated with the spread of the COVID-19 virus may be based on weak and overly-optimistic evidence from studies that are biased and unreliable, suggests research published by The BMJ today.