Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A recent study of patient health records found that around 1 in 100 people with COVID-19 had a venal or arterial thrombosis, with rates higher still among males, and particularly for those hospitalised.

Covid data model

It has been previously estimated that the risk of venal thrombosis (VTE) among people hospitalised with COVID-19 is around 9% while the risk of an or arterial thrombosis (ATE) is 4%. However, little data exists for these events in patients who have not been admitted to hospital.

A new study published in the Lancet Infectious Diseases, estimates the incidence of VTE and ATE among almost 1 million people with COVID-19, using routinely collected data from across Europe. The study found that for people with COVID-19, the risks ranged from 0.2% to 0.8% for VTE. For ATE it was from 0.1% to 0.8%.

Incidence of these events increased to 4.5% and 3.1% for those hospitalised with COVID-19. Meanwhile, 90-day mortality was between 1.1% and 2.0% among COVID-19 cases and increased to 14.6% for those hospitalised.
Results also showed that being male was generally associated with an increased risk of VTE, ATE, and death, as were various comorbidities and prior medications.

Dani Prieto-Alhambra, Professor of Pharmaco- and Device Epidemiology at NDORMS said: "While risks are somewhat low overall, given the vast numbers of people who have been infected with SARS-CoV-2, these relatively small risks translate into large numbers of people being affected. The consequences to health, including risk of death, are significant, underlining the importance of effective treatment strategies in the management of severe COVID-19 to reduce their frequency. We need more research into potential strategies to minimise the risk of thrombosis amongst patients with non-hospitalized COVID-19, including possibly vaccines but also blood thinners".

"Our findings highlight the widespread ill-effects associated with COVID-19" commented Ed Burn, Senior Researcher at the University of Oxford. Adding that "the study was over a time period where few people had been fully vaccinated, and one of the many benefits of vaccines against COVID-19 will likely have been reducing the number of such events occurring in the future."

The study was funded by the European Medicines Agency (EMA).

Similar stories

The new Botnar strategy is announced

After a year as the Director of the Botnar Institute for Musculoskeletal Sciences, Professor Jonathan Rees announces a new structure and strategy that will further enhance research and treatment of bone, joint and musculoskeletal conditions.

New global health grant to improve outcomes for patients with hip fracture

Hip fracture patients in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMIC) in Asia are set to benefit from a new study that aims to bring best practice programmes to improve quality of life for patients and reduce healthcare costs.

NDORMS welcomes great-granddaughter of former Head of Department

Julia Strubell, great-granddaughter of Professor Josep Trueta, visited NDORMS to find out about his time here and to share her own work with staff and students.

Botnar researchers awarded Fellowships

Arani Vivekanantham has been awarded an NIHR Doctoral Fellowship and a Versus Arthritis Clinical Research Fellowship, and Rachel Kuo was awarded an NIHR Doctoral Research Fellowship.

Better diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune diseases moves a step closer

A study published in Nature outlines a way to find the crucial peptides (protein fragments) that drive autoimmunity, as well as the immune cells that respond to them.

New drug offers hope for people with hand osteoarthritis

A new study, published in Science Translational Medicine by researchers at the University of Oxford has identified that Talarozole, a drug that is known to increase retinoic acid, was able to prevent osteoarthritis (OA) in disease models.