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Fiona Powrie, Director of the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology at the University of Oxford has been selected as the next Deputy Chair of Wellcome’s Board of Governors.

Fiona Powrie © Thomas S. G. Farnetti Wellcome

Wellcome is a global charitable foundation that funds thousands of researchers. It works with academia, philanthropy, businesses, governments, civil society and the public around the world to support science's role in solving health challenges.

With a background in immunology and translational research, Fiona has been a member of Wellcome's Board of Governors since January 2018. She will take up her post in January 2022 from Professor Mike Ferguson, who is stepping down from the Board and Wellcome after 10 years.

Following her appointment, Fiona said: "It is an honour and privilege to serve Wellcome as Deputy Chair. It's an organisation that I've always admired from the beginning of my career. I look forward to working with everyone at Wellcome to help deliver our new strategy that harnesses science and research to improve health for all."

Commenting on her appointment, Julia Gillard, Chair of Wellcome, said: "Fiona's new role as Deputy Chair will allow us to benefit even more from her experience in science and research. I look forward to working with her to drive forward Wellcome's mission to solve the urgent health challenges facing everyone."

Professor Andrew Carr, Head of Department at NDORMS, University of Oxford said: "We send our warm congratulations to Fiona on this new appointment. Fiona's pioneering work in immunology has contributed to a better understanding, prevention and treatment of disease which will help advance global scientific discovery research at Wellcome."

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