Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

In a new study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, scientists at NDORMS investigated if chronic inflammation was a feature of Achilles tendinopathy and rupture.

Figure: Schematic summarising the cellular and molecular features of chronic inflammation identified from cross-sectional assessments of functionally distinct tendons.

Achilles tendon disorders including tendinopathy and rupture are a common cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability. These injuries require prolonged rehabilitation and have a high frequency of recurrence.

In a study by Stephanie Dakin et al, entitled ImPAcT (Inflammation and Pain in Achilles Tendinopathy), scientists teamed up with the OxSport and John Radcliffe Trauma teams to investigate the cellular and molecular features of inflammation in patient biopsy samples of tendinopathic and ruptured Achilles.

The aim of the study was to investigate if energy storing tendons such as the Achilles shared common cellular and molecular inflammatory mechanisms with those previously identified in disease of positional shoulder tendons.

The study showed that chronic inflammation was a feature of both mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy and rupture. Tissue inflammation signatures differed in ruptured compared to non-ruptured Achilles, likely to be due to acute inflammation and increased vascularisation resulting from recent trauma.

The investigators concluded that whilst Achilles and rotator cuff tendons are functionally distinct, they share common cellular and molecular inflammatory disease mechanisms, including macrophage and stromal fibroblast activation (summarized below). Future research will focus on developing new therapeutic approaches to promote resolution of inflammation in chronic tendinopathy.

Read the full article in the British Journal of Sports Medicine:

BJSM.jpg

Funding Bodies

ucb-logo-blue.png

ArthritisResearch_HZ_RGB_Logo_300dpi.jpg

NIHR NHS_Logo_Funded by Stamp.jpg

Similar stories

Patient and public involvement in Rheumatology research – embracing the wave of change

On launching the new OPEN ARMS PPI group in Oxford, Dr. Laura Coates explored the patient and public involvement (PPI) models of three academic centres in the UK to show how it benefits researchers, clinicians, and patients alike.

Neutrophil molecular wiring revealed: transcriptional blueprint of short-lived cells

Researchers publish the first blueprint of transcriptional factors that control neutrophil-driven inflammation in Nature Immunology.

NDORMS joins research partnership to understand links between overlapping long-term conditions

The links between different long-term health conditions will be explored in new research funded with a £2.5million grant from the Medical Research Council.

NDORMS researchers awarded grant for study on the effects of COVID-19 vaccines on long COVID

A team of NDORMS researchers including Doctor Annika Jödicke and Doctor Victoria Strauss have been awarded NIHR funding to carry out a study into the effects of different COVID-19 vaccines on long COVID.

New therapeutic targets identified in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis

Researchers identify two inflammatory-driving proteins, osteopontin and CCL2, highly expressed in psoriatic arthritis joints.

Researchers show the role of cilia in cartilage health

New research shows that disrupting primary cilia in juvenile, adolescent and early adulthood in cartilage stops it maturing correctly, making it more prone to thinning and the potential for osteoarthritis (OA) in later life.