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Fantastic, I hope you keep doing it! - Head of Science, Cheney School

Earlier this month twenty four students from local schools took part in a morning of activities designed to introduce them to the work of the Kennedy and the advanced microscopy techniques that play a key role in its success.

 

 

Lenses and lasers 

The morning started with Professor Mike Dustin giving a brief overview of the work of the Kennedy Institute and also explained some of the science behind the microscopes that they would be seeing later including a demonstration of the science behind fluorescence using tennis balls.   

 

I liked the combination of physics and biology. 
- A-Level student

 

 

 

 

 

After the talk they split into groups to take part in a range of activities including a tour of the laboratories and a histology practical.

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Students taking part in the Histology Practical

 

Everyone in the labs was fabulous.
- A-Level student
Saw amazing lab equipment for the first time.
- A-Level student

 

 

 

 

 

 

But, of course, the day would not be complete without a demonstration of the microscopes themselves.  Students were particularly entranced by the demonstration T-Cells moving in real time under the TIRF Microscope.

 

 IMG_4859.jpgLab Tour photo

 

It was so amazing to see real cells move.
- A-Level Student

They were also able to compare tissue from a variety of different organs using the confocal microscope.  

The day finished off with a Q&A session where students could find out the answers to any questions they hadn't had a chance to ask.

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 A big thanks to Mike, Volodymyr, Alan, James, Ewoud, Jessica, Junyu, Rosella,  Luciana and Unni for running the activities and escorting the groups; Tiph and Adrian who helped the day run so smoothly and Anjali for organising the day.

 

Seeing the application of the theory was amazing. Thank you!
- A-Level student

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