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Congratulations to Professors Sallie Lamb and Alan Silman on being appointed to serve on assessment sub-panels for the next Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021.

The REF assesses the quality and impact of research in UK higher education institutions and determines their core funding.

The process is structured in two phases, the criteria phase taking place this year and the assessment phase, which will commence in late 2020 and continue throughout 2021. The latter will involve the full assessment of submissions made by institutions.

Sallie Lamb, Kadoorie Professor of Trauma Rehabilitation and Director of the Centre for Statistics in Medicine at NDORMS is an interdisciplinary advisor for sub-panel 3 (Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy). This is a new role introduced for REF 2021.

Speaking of the appointment, Professor Lamb said: "I am looking forward to contributing to the development of new and important perspectives in the REF. Team science and excellence in inter-disciplinary research will be at the core of innovation and University research cultures of the future."

Professor of Musculoskeletal Health at NDORMS, Alan Silman will serve on sub-panel 2 (Public Health, Health Services and Primary Care). Professor Silman has supported the previous three exercises, both as chair and vice-chair of sub-panels and brings a lot of experience to the assessment team.

"My previous experience has provided substantial insights into how research is evaluated, given the number of different dimensions of assessment. Weighing up the contribution of the novelty of the question, the complexity of the methods and the value of the actual results is never easy. Chairing a previous epidemiology panel was a particular challenge given our desire that the assessment exercise should follow the same ideals of freedom of bias and reproducibility that should underscore any robust epidemiological study!", said Professor Silman.

Chairs and members of the main panels and sub-panels were appointed by the four UK higher education funding bodies following an open nominations process by subject associations and other organisations with an interest in research. Over 4,000 nominations were made for roles across the four main panels and the 34 sub-panels.

The panel members include leading researchers and individuals with expertise in the wider use and benefits of research, as well as members with an international perspective on the main panels.

You can see the full panel and sub-panel membership here.

About the REF

REF2021

See the full panel and sub-panel membership here

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