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Professor Anjali Kusumbe and Professor Cyrus Cooper have been presented with research awards by the European Calcified Tissue Society (ECTS).

Anjali Kusumbe and Cyrus Cooper

Anjali Kusumbe was presented the ECTS Iain T Boyle Award, which recognises young scientists who have made significant progress and contribution to the field of bone and calcified tissue. 

On winning the award, Anjali said “The award recognises our research on bone vasculature and its impact on bone health and future implications for managing bone diseases. We will dedicate further efforts towards understanding the new vascular roles in bone during normal and disease conditions. So honoured and very grateful to the ECTS for this award."  

The Steven Boonen Clinical Research Award, awarded to Professor Cyrus Cooper, recognises doctors who have made significant progress and contribution to the field of bone clinical bone disease research. 

Cyrus said "I am greatly honoured to be the recipient of this prestigious ECTS award and to have been invited to deliver the opening lecture at this eminent Congress. Above all it is a privilege to be recognized by the ECTS membership, and by a respected organization which is renowned its excellence in advancing calcified tissue research within Europe."  

The ECTS is the major organisation in Europe for researchers and clinicians working in the musculoskeletal field. 

 

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