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Oxford Pain, Activity and Lifestyle (OPAL) study

The total number of patients recruited into the OPAL cohort study reached 2,000 in June 2017! 

With the help of GP practices in 7 regions, the study aims to gather information from over 4,000 older people from across England. Reaching the half-way point is a major milestone in the progress of the study. 

The OPAL study is a 5-year survey study which looks at how people's health and physical activity change over time. Data collected will improve our understanding of how a person’s health, including conditions such as back pain, affect their mobility as they age, and provide insight into improving the management of health in older adults.  

The aim of the study is to develop a tool to help older people, GPs and other health professionals identify when low back pain is a risk factor for disability, functional limitation and loss of mobility, and when it should be prioritised as a treatment target.

The study team thank all recruiting GP practices and patients who have consented to join the study. 

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