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Oxford University has today been awarded a £2.4 million grant, as part of the Kennedy Trust MB PhD scheme, to fund undergraduate medical students to undertake DPhil research in the areas of inflammation, immunology and musculoskeletal disease.

The Kennedy Trust logo

The scheme will fund 15 students a year for 5 years, 4 of whom will be in Oxford. The other successful Universities Birmingham, Manchester and Glasgow/Edinburgh. The scheme follows the successful launch this year of a BM DPhil educational training program in cancer studies funded by CRUK. Students will be hosted within the Medical Sciences Doctoral training program.

Professor Paul Bowness, Professor of Experimental Rheumatology who led the application, said: "Oxford is thrilled to join the Kennedy Trust MB PhD scheme. This scheme will provide a unique opportunity to educate a new generation of clinician scientists, harnessing Oxford's established research strengths. We are confident these doctors will lead research for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal diseases many years to come."

Professor Sir Stephen Holgate, The Kennedy Trust's Chairman and MRC Professor of Immunopharmacology at the University of Southampton, said: "The MB PhD initiative combines two of the Kennedy Trust's key aims: investment into translational research and the support of early career scientists. We are delighted to build upon the fantastic programme established by the University of Oxford and we are confident that the Trust's MB PhD scheme will deliver the next generation of clinical academic leaders in musculoskeletal and inflammatory disease research.'"

More details of the Kennedy Trust announcement

How to apply for the Oxford Kennedy MB PhD (BM DPhil) Educational Training Program.

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