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Many congratulations to Professor Michael Dustin on his election as a member of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO).

Professor Dustin was one of 65 outstanding life scientists to be elected to its membership, joining a group of more than 1700 of the best researchers in Europe and around the world.

Professor Michael Dustin joins Professor Fiona Powrie and Sir Marc Feldman as EMBO members from the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology.

EMBO Director Maria Leptin said:

“Election to the EMBO Membership is recognition of research excellence, and I am pleased to welcome so many great scientists to our organisation.”

She continues: “We received more nominations than ever before during this election cycle, which pays tribute to the strength and diversity of the European life sciences. Drawing on our new members’ expertise and insight will be invaluable in helping EMBO to deliver and strengthen its programmes and activities in the years to come.”

Professor Dustin exclaimed:

“It’s an honour to be elected a member of EMBO only a few years after arriving here in the UK. I look forward to contributing to EMBO’s mission in years to come.”

EMBO Members are actively involved in the execution of the organisation’s initiatives by evaluating applications for EMBO funding and by serving on EMBO Council, Committees and Editorial Boards.

An online directory with all existing and new EMBO Members is available at people.embo.org.

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