Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A recent study by researchers at the University of Oxford and Koç University in Istanbul revealed new epigenetic inhibitors that substantially increase the efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) generation by overcoming intrinsic somatic cell barriers.

Horizontal portrait of Professor Udo Oppermann

The research published in Nature Chemical Biology can dramatically improve the technology around induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and their application in medical research.

iPSCs hold therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine and enable personalised drug discovery efforts and understanding the patient-specific basis of disease. They are typically derived by introducing pluripotency-associated genes, or "reprogramming factors", into a given somatic cell type, in what is currently a slow and inefficient process.

We have discovered that newly developed CBP/EP300 bromodomain inhibitors decrease histone lysine acetylation, chromatin accessibility and expression of genes related to somatic cell identity and promote transition to the stem cell state. This result adds important information how to significantly improve the iPSC technology” says Associate Professor Tamer Onder at Koç University.

Professor Udo Oppermann, from the University of Oxford, adds: "This study, supported by the Royal Society under Newton-Katip Celebi Fund grant scheme, is a wonderful example how international teams can effectively collaborate by student and scientist exchanges. We are very grateful for this support and will continue this exciting collaboration to advance stem cell epigenetic studies".

Currently the teams are continuing their collaborative research into further epigenetic factors that facilitate and improve the production and application of iPSCs in medical research.

Similar stories

Study reveals the three most important aspects of care for hip fractures

Hip Main OCTRU Research Trauma

Older patients with hip fractures recover better if they receive treatment under the supervision of both a surgeon and a specialist in elderly care; are checked to avoid future falls; and are assessed for memory problems.

Major ERC funding awarded to Professor Michael Dustin

Awards Kennedy Main

Professor Michael Dustin and an international team of collaborators have been awarded a €10M grant from the European Research Council (ERC) to develop a new biotechnology around supramolecular attack particles (SMAPs) engineered to kill cancer cells.

The role of mAbs (neutralising monoclonal antibodies) in the fight against COVID-19

Main Research

Neutralising mAbs, a form of anti-viral medicine, are being explored as an attractive option to treat symptoms of COVID-19 and in some cases prevent infection. But what are the pros and cons of this type of treatment and what should regulators consider before granting approval?

Professor Michael Dustin elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Awards Kennedy Main

Recognised for his outstanding contributions to the field of immunology, Michael becomes the fourth Kennedy professor to be elected to the Academy.

Small mechanical forces in immune cells measured at unprecedented sensitivity

Kennedy Main Research

Oxford researchers have used advanced microscopy techniques to measure previously unseen forces generated by cells during an immune response; a breakthrough for mechanobiology and future advances in health and disease.

NDORMS researchers awarded for Dupuytren research

Awards Hand Kennedy Main

Three NDORMS researchers have received awards from the International Dupuytren Society, a patient organisation that brings together Dupuytren Disease patient societies from across the world.