Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Research by NDORMS Dominic Furniss, Professor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, finds that surgery for the common hand disorder Dupuytren’s disease is safe and effective. However, repeat surgery could carry higher risks of complications such as finger amputation.

Elderly woman suffering from pain From Rheumatoid Arthritis © one photo/Shutterstock.com

Dupuytren’s disease is a condition that effects the hands. The tissue beneath the skin of the palm becomes thickened which often does not limit the use of the hand. But one in three suffer from Dupuytren’s contracture, which means their fingers ben inwards, and they need surgery to straighten them. 

The study looked at three different types of surgery for Dupuytren’s disease and the risk of complications each operation came with, including the need for repeat operations. 

The team hope that the research will help surgeons and patients understand the risks and benefits of the different types of surgery. Professor Furniss said: “The main message of our study is that surgery for Dupuytren’s disease as practiced in the NHS is safe.

We’ve known for a long time that repeat surgery is more difficult than primary surgery. This is because operating through scar tissue increases the risk of damage to nerves and blood vessels. But we found that repeating surgery after dermofasciectomy carried a surprisingly high risk of damaging the blood supply. Despite the relatively high risk, this is a rare event. As such, many surgeons would see few cases like this during their career and would find it difficult to estimate the risk for patients. Using large national datasets, as we did in this study, can help surgeons and patients understand the risks. 

Surgery for many hand conditions is being increasingly rationed in the NHS, with something of a postcode lottery. The work we’re doing underlines the fact that this is not equitable and shouldn’t be restricted.” 

Read the full story on the NIHR website. 

 

 

Similar stories

New guidelines to improve reporting standards of studies that investigate causal mechanisms

Researchers at NDORMS have developed a new set of guidelines for reporting mediation analyses in health research.

New Associate Professors announced at NDORMS

The Medical Sciences Division has awarded the title of Associate Professor to five senior researchers at NDORMS.

COVID-19 vaccines shown to reduce infection by 90% in nursing homes

A new collaborative study between the Catalan Institute of Health, the Public Health Secreatariat of Catalonia, and the Centre for Statistics in Medicine, NDORMS, at the University of Oxford have confirmed that COVID-19 vaccines greatly reduce infections, hospitalisations and mortality for up to 6 months.

The Kennedy Institute completes its roof extension

Building work at the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology has finished, providing a new third floor that houses additional meeting and collaboration space for data science and offices for the management of clinical trials.

Unlocking the secrets of the microbiome

Jethro Johnson, Deputy Director of the Oxford Centre for Microbiome Research explains how the centre is building a research community to understand the microbiome and harness its power to promote health and prevent disease.

Into the future: watching biology unfold

As part of the University of Oxford’s mission to provide its researchers with the newest state-of-the-art optical imaging equipment and as part of a strategic partnership with the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology (KIR), the Institute of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine (IDRM), and Carl Zeiss AG (ZEISS), ZEISS has installed a ZEISS Lattice Lightsheet 7 microscope at the KIR.