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Dr Kristina Zec has been awarded a Versus Arthritis Foundation Fellowship to investigate the role of products of lipid oxidation produced by synovial macrophages in triggering articular inflammation.

Kristina Zec

Working in the Udalova Group, the 36-month fellowship will enable Kristina to also assess some novel approaches to limiting disease by a combination of therapeutics and diet.  

Kristina said: “I am extremely happy and honoured to have received a Versus Arthritis Foundation Fellowship. The project I have developed with Irina’s support has translational potential and will significantly expand our understanding of RA pathology. It will dissect the lipid cues involved in communication between gatekeeping macrophages and neutrophils in arthritis. 

“I believe that lipid language can be modified through changing lipid composition of cellular membranes and by altering lipid processing.  I plan to explore these two ways of changing the lipid language of inflammation to discover and deliver novel treatments.  I am excited to embark on a quest of answering these questions in a highly supportive and inspiring environment of my group and the Kennedy Institute." 

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