Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A clinical trial to test whether Azithromycin, a commonly used antibiotic, can treat the symptoms of COVID-19 in outpatients has recruited its first patient.

Azithromycin package © www.doctor-4-u.co.uk/ via Flickr

The ATOMIC2 trial is being led from Oxford with support from the Oxford Clinical Trials Research Unit (OCTRU) at NDORMS. It will enrol 800 people who are being assessed at hospital with COVID-19 but felt well enough to be cared for at home. Half will receive Azithromycin for two weeks, while the rest will get regular care. Participants will also give samples of blood and samples from the nose so researchers can better understand the biology of the virus.

The trial will take place across 15 sites across England, Wales and Scotland. It complements two other national trials – RECOVERY and PRINCIPLE – which are testing Azithromycin in different categories of patients.

The trial's Chief Investigator is Dr Tim Hinks of the University of Oxford's Nuffield Department of Medicine and an Oxford BRC Senior Fellow. He said: "Azithromycin is an antibiotic with unusual anti-inflammatory and anti-viral properties, so it is being seen as a promising potential treatment for COVID-19.

In COVID-19 patients, there is a window of opportunity of about two weeks when the disease progresses from mild symptoms, such as fatigue, fever and cough, to severe respiratory failure.

Azithromycin is safe, inexpensive and available worldwide, so if effective, it could be a very useful weapon in the fight against this pandemic. And even if we find that the drug is not effective against the symptoms of COVID-19, it is still an important finding."

Azithromycin, or AZM, is widely used to tackle a wide range of infections, such as trachoma, a cause of blindness, genital infections, pneumonias, multidrug resistant tuberculosis and a wide range of inflammatory lung diseases and viruses, and so it's important it is only used where really effective to prevent development of antibiotic resistance.
It also has additional antibacterial properties which may help prevent secondary bacterial infection, present in 16 percent of COVID-19 deaths.

The trial has received funding from the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre (BRC), as well as the University of Oxford and Pfizer.

 

Similar stories

NDORMS researchers awarded for Dupuytren research

Awards Hand Kennedy Main

Three NDORMS researchers have received awards from the International Dupuytren Society, a patient organisation that brings together Dupuytren Disease patient societies from across the world.

Hope for rheumatoid arthritis patients who are non-responsive to anti-TNF

Arthritis Kennedy Main

New research published in The Lancet shows that tocilizumab is a more effective treatment than rituximab for rheumatoid arthritis patients with a poor response to anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF).

A new study maps the expression of innate immune receptors during the course of arthritis

Arthritis Kennedy Main

The research, which was a collaboration with researchers from Oxford University and Queen Mary University of London and published in Journal of Autoimmunity, looked at changes in receptors known as toll-like receptors (TLRs) in arthritis at different stages of disease.

International Women's Day

Department Main

It’s International Women's Day! This year’s theme is #Choosetochallenge. We’re celebrating some of the amazing women at NDORMS, and asking them what changes they’d like to see in medical sciences over the next 100 years.

Patients and carers invited to join new group helping to shape research and treatment of bones, muscles and joints

Main PPI

Oxford’s newest patient partner group, OPEN ARMS launches today to explore the causes, treatment and care for patients with musculoskeletal conditions. Its first three patient partners explain why they are involved and invite other members of the public to join the team.

NDORMS academics named NIHR Senior Investigators

Main

Congratulations to Professor Jonathan Rees who has been announced as a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR Senior Investigator).