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Professors Irina Udalova and Paul Bowness have been selected to the British Society for Immunology (BSI) Congress Committee, starting in October 2016.

The BSI is the largest society in Europe and one of the oldest, largest, and most active immunology societies in the world. Its main objective is to promote and support excellence in research, scholarship and clinical practice in immunology for the benefit of human and animal health and welfare.

The committee is tasked with the planning and delivery of the BSI's Annual Congress, their flagship event which attracts over 1,000 delegates from around the world. The committee leads on drawing up the programme, selecting invited speakers and reviewing submitted abstracts as well as having responsibility for budget planning and overall conference organisation.

Professor Udalova said: "I am very pleased to join the BSI Congress committee. I thoroughly enjoyed shaping the Macrophage biology session for the BSI 2014 congress and felt I could contribute more to planning and delivery of future congresses. These congresses have been invaluable for exposing students and young scientists to the cutting edge questions in immunology and for fostering their interactions with peers throughout the UK."

"The British Society for Immunology (BSI) is now in its 60th year and remains at the forefront of education and discussion in the field of immunology, with its congress the flagship scientific and educational event. I am delighted to be given the opportunity to help shape this going forward." added Professor Bowness.

Both Professors Udalova and Bowness are due to attend their first meeting of the Congress Committee in October, joining the 16 member committee as their terms of office officially start.

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