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Three NDORMS researchers have received awards from the International Dupuytren Society, a patient organisation that brings together Dupuytren Disease patient societies from across the world.

Collage of Thomas Layton, Lynn Williams and Osaid Alser.

The International Dupuytren Award 2021 for Basic Research was shared between two researchers from the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology at NDORMS. Lynn Williams was recognised for her paper "Identifying collagen VI as a target of fibrotic diseases regulated by CREBBP/EP300" published in PNAS, and Thomas Layton for "Cellular census of human fibrosis defines functionally distinct stromal cell types and states" which appeared in Nature Communications.

The award for Best Clinical Paper award was won by Osaid Alser for the work he completed as MSc by Research student at NDORMS before graduating and moving to Harvard. His paper "Serious complications and risk of re-operation after Dupuytren’s disease surgery: a population-based cohort study of 121,488 patients in England" appeared in Nature Scientific Reports.

Dominic Furniss, who co-supervised Osaid and Thomas, said: “My congratulations go to our researchers who have been recognised for their work by the International Dupuytren Society. The research explores the underlying causes of Dupuyren’s disease and helps us move towards improving treatment for this disabling condition.”

The International Dupuytren Award recognises exceptional scientific publications on research or clinical treatment of Dupuytren and/or Ledderhose disease. 

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