Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Head of Department Professor Andrew Carr has received the Arthur Steindler Award at this year’s Orthopaedic Research Association Annual Meeting.

The Arthur Steindler Award is given every other year to recognise an outstanding global contribution to orthopaedic research. The Award distinguishes "senior scientists, clinicians and educators who, throughout their professional lifetime, have made significant contributions - nationally and internationally - to the understanding of the musculoskeletal system and musculoskeletal diseases and injuries."

An orthopaedic surgeon, Professor Andrew Carr's research group focuses on improving evidence for the effectiveness of surgery generally and translating new surgical techniques and implants into the clinic.

Arthur Steiner MD was an orthopaedic surgeon, scientist and teacher, acknowledged by his peers as a pioneer in clinical and research advances in orthopaedic surgery and rehabilitation, having been instrumental in the passage of two Iowa laws that significantly altered the state's health care landscape. His research studies and medical textbooks were widely published and used by generations of medical students and residents in the US.

Similar stories

NDORMS joins research partnership to understand links between overlapping long-term conditions

The links between different long-term health conditions will be explored in new research funded with a £2.5million grant from the Medical Research Council.

New therapeutic targets identified in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis

Researchers identify two inflammatory-driving proteins, osteopontin and CCL2, highly expressed in psoriatic arthritis joints.

Researchers show the role of cilia in cartilage health

New research shows that disrupting primary cilia in juvenile, adolescent and early adulthood in cartilage stops it maturing correctly, making it more prone to thinning and the potential for osteoarthritis (OA) in later life.

New research could improve quality of life for Psoriatic Arthritis patients

Professors Laura Coates and Dani Prieto-Alhambra will take major roles in a new European Commission project to develop innovative personalised treatment options for people affected by psoriatic arthritis.

Exploring the link between joint injury and osteoarthritis

A new study published in The Lancet Rheumatology shows potential ways to predict how likely someone is to develop osteoarthritis after a knee injury.