Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Researchers and families get weaving on Super Science Saturday

On Saturday,  NDORMS researcher Joana Martins, supported by Klara Berencsi and Natalie Ford, took part in Super Science Saturday at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.  Over the course of the afternoon we talked to around 120 people about the Oxford Biopatch and many children took part in the various weaving activities that we had as part of the stall (the biopatch includes a woven component, so earlier research stages involved our researchers weaving on a wooden loom).  

We had an amazing time talking to people of all ages and next time we’ll know to prepare even more cardboard looms for people to use!

More ABOUT THE OXFORD BIOPATCH FROM our Family Leaflet

The muscles in our body are attached to our bones with tendons. Sometimes the tendons in our shoulder get torn and this makes the shoulder painful and difficult to move. People with damaged shoulders can get surgery to try to mend the damage to their shoulder. This is currently done by sewing the tear together with surgical thread but researchers would like to find new ways to make the tendons heal better.

Researchers from the University of Oxford have created a new type of surgical thread which is made of the same material but which, rather than being smooth and solid like normal surgical thread, has a special surface which encourages new tendon material to grow around and through it. Using the new type of thread, they have also made a special patch, the Oxford Biopatch, which holds the tear together and at the same time helps the body to mend the tear by encouraging it to build new tendon material on and around the patch.  The patch comes in two parts, a thin but flimsy layer which encourages new tendon growth and a woven layer which makes the patch stronger and easier to sew into place. The whole patch dissolves slowly in the body and is completely gone after a few months, leaving the newly healed tear behind.

The woven layer is made using the same techniques as we use to make cloth - horizontal threads are passed over and under vertical threads. The machine that is used to do this is known as a loom. Because the patch will be used inside people’s bodies, the patch has to be tested in lots of different ways to check that it works and is safe. So far it has passed all the tests but there are still more tests it has to pass before it can be regularly used to help shoulders to mend better.

Similar stories

NDORMS researchers awarded for Dupuytren research

Awards Hand Kennedy Main

Three NDORMS researchers have received awards from the International Dupuytren Society, a patient organisation that brings together Dupuytren Disease patient societies from across the world.

Hope for rheumatoid arthritis patients who are non-responsive to anti-TNF

Arthritis Kennedy Main

New research published in The Lancet shows that tocilizumab is a more effective treatment than rituximab for rheumatoid arthritis patients with a poor response to anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF).

A new study maps the expression of innate immune receptors during the course of arthritis

Arthritis Kennedy Main

The research, which was a collaboration with researchers from Oxford University and Queen Mary University of London and published in Journal of Autoimmunity, looked at changes in receptors known as toll-like receptors (TLRs) in arthritis at different stages of disease.

International Women's Day

Department Main

It’s International Women's Day! This year’s theme is #Choosetochallenge. We’re celebrating some of the amazing women at NDORMS, and asking them what changes they’d like to see in medical sciences over the next 100 years.

Patients and carers invited to join new group helping to shape research and treatment of bones, muscles and joints

Main PPI

Oxford’s newest patient partner group, OPEN ARMS launches today to explore the causes, treatment and care for patients with musculoskeletal conditions. Its first three patient partners explain why they are involved and invite other members of the public to join the team.

NDORMS academics named NIHR Senior Investigators

Main

Congratulations to Professor Jonathan Rees who has been announced as a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR Senior Investigator).