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The University of Oxford and St Hilda's College are delighted to announce the creation of a new Chair of Clinical Therapeutics thanks to initial, generous, philanthropic support from Professor John Climax. The donation was confirmed at a signing ceremony on Friday 15th December 2017.

Left to Right: Sir Gordon Duff, Principal of St Hilda's College; Professor John Climax; Professor Andrew Carr, Head of NDORMS; Dr Sarah Norman, Senior Tutor, St Hilda's College. Photo credit John Cairns

Through the establishment of this Chair, Oxford will be in a position to address a significant challenge facing universities today: how to translate novel therapies quickly and sustainably from laboratory to clinic.

Under their leadership, the University will establish a new Centre for Clinical Therapeutics, based within the Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences (NDORMS), headed by Professor Andrew Carr. Through this centre, the Chair will work to develop close partnerships within Oxford, and more widely with the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostics industries, in order to drive new drug treatments through early phase clinical trials.

In addition to funding the Chair, the gift will be used to endow new Fellowships in Clinical Therapeutics. This will open the doors of opportunity to many early and mid-career clinical scientists, enabling them to develop their expertise and practical experience in early phase clinical trials at Oxford. Both the Chair and Fellowships will be associated with St Hilda's College.

Read more (on Oxford Thinking website)      

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