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On International Women's Day 2018, we are celebrating all NDORMS women and men who work together with these women towards gender equality. We invite you to meet a few of the women leading the way and ready to #PressforProgress on this 8 March.

STephanie Dakin 

Associate Professor 

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"It’s inspiring to be amongst the women within NDORMS who re-define conventional boundaries by delivering world class scientific research and occupy senior academic posts. I feel privileged to have the opportunity to make a contribution to science surrounded by these strong female role models in an environment that recognises their achievements. I hope to encourage and inspire the next generation of clinicians and scientists in their pursuit of excellence in musculoskeletal sciences."

Lei
 Clifton

Senior Medical Statistician 

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"I am a mother of two young boys, and a senior medical statistician. The supportive working environment in NDORMS has allowed me to achieve a good work-life balance. I find my work fulfilling because I am making a difference in our patient care through my statistical work on clinical trials. Every trial is different with its own challenges, making my work enjoyable and exciting."

Natalie Ford 

Outreach and Public Engagement Officer

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"Throughout my career, I have always found working with people to engage them with science is incredibly fulfilling.  Nothing beats the gasp of wonder at a beautiful scientific phenomenon that someone is seeing for the first time.  Now I am working at NDORMS I’m enjoying the opportunity to enable other people to experience that same joy that comes with sharing your passion for your work."

Carla Cohen 

Postdoctoral Research Assistant 

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 "Working in academic research, every day is different, and I enjoy the challenges it brings. The job flexibility is a big advantage so I can juggle science with parenting!"

Jacqueline
 Thompson

Research Physiotherapist 

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"Working as a researcher means a lifetime of an opportunity to contribute to the advance of the evidence-base that informs health policy and innovation in our health system."

Sarah Snelling

University Research Lecturer

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"Through my research, teaching roles and position as senior scientific officer for the Oxford NIHR BRC Musculoskeletal theme I get to communicate about science to a range of audiences, guide research and I’m constantly learning. What does it mean to have a career in science? Well, I’ve found a niche that really does tick all the boxes. I am lucky enough to spend my time asking questions and finding ways to answer them. Writing and communication is an integral part of my work, and much of science is about weaving a story. It’s great to work alongside so many amazing students, colleagues and collaborators and hopefully encourage a few others into science-related careers along the way."

Liliana Cifuentes

Clinical Research Fellow In Translational Biology 

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"Hearing patients saying “I could not do this for years and now I can" during the participation in a trial, gives me the motivation to keep going."

Cynthia Srikesavan

Postdoctoral Research Assistant In Physiotherapy 

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“My career in health research absolutely empowers me…I am passionate about the research work I do and proud to be a part of the rehabilitation research team here at NDORMS".

Catherine
 Swales

Consultant Rheumatologist and Director Undergraduate Studies

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"I love my career in science - it gives me the privilege of always asking questions. And as a mother in science, I can now try to answer those questions that kids love to ask : "Why is the sky blue? Why do we breathe? What are dreams?" I'm not sure I have all the answers - who does? - but there's such joy in their asking..."

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NDORMS values, supports and develops every person working in the department. 
Let’s keep pressing for change and progressing gender parity! #PressforProgress

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