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Epidemiological studies have shown an association between increased bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoarthritis (OA), but whether this represents cause or effect remains unclear. In this study, we used a novel approach to investigate this question, determining whether individuals with High Bone Mass (HBM) have a higher prevalence of radiographic hip OA compared with controls.HBM cases came from the UK-based HBM study: HBM was defined by BMD Z-score. Unaffected relatives of index cases were recruited as family controls. Age-stratified random sampling was used to select further population controls from the Chingford and Hertfordshire cohort studies. Pelvic radiographs were pooled and assessed by a single observer blinded to case-control status. Analyses used logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender and body mass index (BMI).530 HBM hips in 272 cases (mean age 62.9 years, 74% female) and 1702 control hips in 863 controls (mean age 64.8 years, 84% female) were analysed. The prevalence of radiographic OA, defined as Croft score ≥3, was higher in cases compared with controls (20.0% vs 13.6%), with adjusted odds ratio (OR) [95% CI] 1.52 [1.09, 2.11], P = 0.013. Osteophytes (OR 2.12 [1.61, 2.79], P < 0.001) and subchondral sclerosis (OR 2.78 [1.49, 5.18], P = 0.001) were more prevalent in cases. However, no difference in the prevalence of joint space narrowing (JSN) was seen (OR 0.97 [0.72, 1.33], P = 0.869).An increased prevalence of radiographic hip OA and osteophytosis was observed in HBM cases compared with controls, in keeping with a positive association between HBM and OA and suggesting that OA in HBM has a hypertrophic phenotype.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.joca.2014.06.007

Type

Journal article

Journal

Osteoarthritis and cartilage

Publication Date

08/2014

Volume

22

Pages

1120 - 1128

Addresses

Musculoskeletal Research Unit, School of Clinical Sciences, University of Bristol, UK; MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, University of Bristol, UK. Electronic address: Sarah.Hardcastle@bristol.ac.uk.

Keywords

Hip Joint, Humans, Bone Diseases, Metabolic, Osteoarthritis, Hip, Absorptiometry, Photon, Prevalence, Bone Density, Aged, Middle Aged, Female, Male, Osteophyte, United Kingdom