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Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common condition of the hand that is caused by compression of the median nerve in the wrist. Symptoms include numbness, tingling, pain in the fingers, and weakness of the thumb - it can therefore be a very disabling condition for patients. Tens of thousands of carpal tunnel release operations are performed in the UK each year. While most patients improve following surgery, some patients do not improve, or get recurrent symptoms.

It is not known why some people develop CTS while others do not. Some people appear to be genetically predisposed to developing CTS, but there are also occupational and lifestyle factors that increase the risk of developing the condition. CTS is therefore likely to be what is called a complex disease, where several genetic and non-genetic factors interact to cause the disease.

What are the aims of the study?

We believe that variations in some genes are likely to predispose some people to CTS, and the purpose of this study is to find out which genes are involved.
These studies will help us to understand what causes CTS, and lead to the development of new treatments in the future, reducing the need for, and recurrence after surgery. Also, it will hopefully allow us to predict who will do well and who will do not so well with surgery for CTS.

 

If you have any questions about the trial or are interested in taking part, please contact the individuals below.

Akira Wilberg (Study Co-ordinator) 

Edmarcia Araujo (Research Facilitator)

Professor Dominic Furniss (Chief Investigator)